Threads of the Divine

This document is obviously not the exact text of the book, but a summary of it.

OVERVIEW

Throughout the centuries there have been many pantheons, and they’re all related. There are 5 core deities, and in many pantheons those 5 were split into various sub deities. The modern monotheistic religions combined much of the worship of the 5 into a single power, based on various philosophers interpretations of the Divine. The Divine are unable to directly influence the world, instead relying on priests to spread the word and influence. The author takes no stance on the motivations of said deities, except to say that he does not believe all of them to have the same motivations. He does indicate that their influence seemed to wane over the last couple centuries, as the modern religions rose in prevalence, theorizing that because the worship was spread out across all the deities, they were unable to maintain that influence. The book also goes into some depth on so-called “demi-gods.” It presents two separate theories relating their birth. The first being that they were humans who had access to powerful artifacts that granted them god-like powers. The author discusses that these artifacts may be conduits that allow the Divine to impart some of their power past whatever boundary presents them from physically manifesting on earth. The other theory is that it is possible that when mother is present near powerful influxes of Divine, it may be possible it to somehow change the developing child into something else. Those beings often exhibit physical perfection, but are just as often prone to a dire fate. More concerning than the Divine however, are the Profane. Referred to in many cultures as Demons and Devils, these entities were not held to the restrictions the Divine were, and were often, in ancient times bound inside prisons, that required powerful artifacts to free. While it does not list the locations of any of these prisons, it does mention that the areas around them are often considered cursed by those who live nearby.

THE CORE FIVE

The author goes into some details of the portfolios of what he believes to be the “Core Five” of the Divine, and theorizes that others are simply offshoot incarnations of those eight.

Apo’lla

The god of family, healing, and life. Apo’lla’s often appears as a sun god in most cultures. Also known as Alaunus(Celtic), Angak(Hopi), Apollo(Greek), Inti(Incan), Malakbet(Arabian), Ra(Epyptian), Sól(Germanic, Roman), Sukunahikona(Japanese), Xu Kail(Chinese).

Art’mis

The god of hunting, nature, and night. While hunting and nature seem at odds with each other, her followers often did their best to teach balance. Also known as Ameretat(Persian), Artemis(Greek), Chandra(as well as Ratri, Hindu), Jacheongbi(Korean), Luna(and Diana Trivia, Roman), Khonsu(Egpytian).

Had’est

The god of death and disease, the author believed Had’est to be the only truly evil deity of the core eight. Had’est collected the souls of the wicked, but allowed those of virtue to pass. Exactly what qualified as virtue or wickedness seems to differ from culture to culture. Nep’tar The god of the sea and storms. The author believes that despite Neptune/Poseidon and Jupiter/ Zeus almost universally appearing as two distinctly different gods they are simply two sides of the same coin, a strange split personality.

Nep’tar

The god of the sea and storms. The author believes that despite Neptune/Poseidon and Jupiter/ Zeus almost universally appearing as two distinctly different gods they are simply two sides of the same coin, a strange split personality.


Val’can

The god of earth, fire, and industry. In many cultures, Val’can introduced fire to humanity. They often appear as the god of crafters in many cultures, and sometimes as a god of the destructiveness of nature. Also appears as Black God(Navajo), Brigit(Celtic), Gerra(Mesopotamian), Hephaestus(Greek), Ogun(Yoruba), Pele(Hawaiian), Ra(Epgytian, in some examples), Sa(Korean), Svarožič, Vulcan(Roman).


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